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 Concurrent Sessions

 

Concurrent Session (201)
FIM Documentation: Part 1—Back to Basics
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Michelle Camicia, MSN RN CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Relate the importance of FIM scoring to reimbursement
  2. Discuss simple strategies to improve accuracy of FIM documentation.
  3. Identify ways to improve FIM scoring completion rates.

Strategies to improve the nurse's documentation of FIM will be explored. Completion rates and accuracy issues will be addressed.

Target Audience: Beginner

Concurrent Session (202)
A Journey into Caring-Caritas Consciousness …IMAGINE the Possibilities

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Tina Roma-Fisher, MSN RN CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Explain the application of Watson's Theory of Human Caring into nursing practice and its impact on real life situations
  2. Explain the Caritas Processes and application in practice through caring-healing modalities such as aromatherapy, human touch, and authentic presence integration in personal and professional lives.

Watson's Theory of Human Caring as the philosophical framework for nursing and the professional practice model of care delivery transforms self and system. This is a reflection of a journey into Caritas Consciousness to clarify and understand the tenets and philosophy of Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Contemporary nursing practice focuses on creating caring environments for nurses, patients, and families within today’s complex healthcare. Theory-guided practice advances rehabilitation nursing. Watson’s theory continues to be advanced in the practice setting as nurses transform from a focus on nursing tasks to “practicing loving kindness, authentic presence, cultivation of one’s spiritual practices, and being in the caring-healing environment and allowing for miracles.” (Watson, 2008, p. 34). This presentation will explain the application of Watson's Theory of Human Caring and the integration of the Caritas Processes™ into practice. Imagine the possibilities as we explore the Journey into Caritas Consciousness.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (203)
Cultural Competence: A Framework to Improve Health Care
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Paul Nathenson, RN ND CRRN HN-BC CTN

Learning objectives:

  1. Analyze the need for cultural competence based on the Transcultural Nursing model and changing demographic trends in the United States.
  2. Differentiate between cultural norms of the three leading minorities in the United States.
  3. Apply Transcultural Nursing theory to improve patient outcomes in their own setting through case study analysis.

The purpose of this presentation is to provide an evidence-based theoretical framework for the development of cultural competence, which has become an essential skill for nurses today. It is essential because one’s healthcare choices, preferences, and understanding is rooted in culture, in order to provide patient individualized care, culture must be considered. The United States is becoming increasingly diverse. According to the Pew Center the non-Hispanic white population is projected to dip below 50% by 2050. In order to facilitate a broader understanding of cultural competence, this presentation demonstrates the application of the Transcultural Nursing model through conceptual analysis and case study. Cultural competence means developing awareness of one’s own cultural identity and views about cultural variation. It allows us to me more effective nurses as we develop the ability to understand the cultural differences that make each patient-family system unique.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (204)
Traumatic Amputations: The Next Steps
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Mary "Beth" Dameron, MSN RN CRRN CCM CBIS

Learning objectives:

  1. The participant will be able to discuss management of the residual limb from post-op to prosthetic preparation.
  2. The participant will be able to identify types of pain associated with traumatic amputation and pain management strategies.

This session will discuss traumatic amputations and the next steps in amputation care. Traumatic amputations may result from a variety of causes including motor vehicle crashes, firearms, machinery, and blasts. Despite the cause, the effect is permanent. These injuries present complex management needs in the physical and psycho-social domains. Caring for this population takes a combination of knowledge, skill sets, and compassion. Nurses are a fundamental building block in the successful rehabilitation of the client with a traumatic amputation. Managing the residual limb post-op to prosthetic preparation is one aspect of recovery. Understanding pain and pain management for the traumatic amputation is another essential aspect. This presentation will review multiple components of care of traumatic amputations and explore some of the newer prosthetic options and procedures to enhance quality of life in the continuum of amputation care.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (301)
Rehabilitation Readmissions: A Look at the Data

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Terrie M. Black, MBA BSN RN-BC CRRN FAHA
Sandra Bennett Illig, MS RN NP

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the importance of monitoring readmissions from a quality perspective
  2. Describe the characteristics of CVA, TBI and SCI patients who were readmitted to acute care after completing rehabilitation
  3. Discuss the implications of readmissions for rehabilitation programs.

Readmission measures can serve as an indicator of whether care coordination has been optimized. CMS has adopted an All-Cause Unplanned Readmission Measure for inpatient rehabilitation facilities. This presentation will describe and compare characteristics of groups of patients (CVA, TBI and SCI), discharged from inpatient rehabilitation, and readmitted within 30 days to an acute care hospital versus those patients who did not require readmission. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional analysis on patients followed up from January 2012 through December 2013. We examined characteristics of those readmitted to acute care within 30 days post discharge versus those who were not. Identifying trends and reasons for re-hospitalization in the post rehabilitation patient can provide valuable insight to the rehabilitation team. Strategies for minimizing readmissions have been documented in the literature. Additional research is needed to identify those patients most at risk to prevent re-hospitalization to acute care after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation.

Target Audience: Intermediate; Advanced

Concurrent Session (302)
Best Practices for Reporting Research

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Elaine Miller, PhD RN CRRN FAAN FAHA

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe how quality research evidence affects applicability to diverse practice settings. 
  2. Review various research reporting standards that can elevate the quality of rehabilitation research and evidence generation.
  3. Describe how Rehabilitation Nursing will dissemination even higher quality evidence to guide your practice.

Given the demand for best evidence to guide our practice, it is imperative that rehabilitation focused research be of the highest quality. Through the adoption of nationally recognized research reporting standards, greater transparency of the quality of the research and its applicability to practice settings will occur; thereby improving care outcomes and identifying areas demanding greater research investigation.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (303)
Best Practice Diabetes Drug Management Secrets

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Sharon Watts, DNP MSN

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify common prescribing rules for diabetes drugs.
  2. Select diabetes therapies for several case study presentations based on best practice prescribing knowledge.

This discussion on diabetes drugs will break down the abundant array of drugs available for the provider to understand which is the best drug to use when and why. Additionally, endocrine tricks of the trade will be shared to help the participant apply this drug knowledge to treat various case study scenarios.

Target Audience: Advanced

Concurrent Session (304)
Teaching Patients to Manage Their Medications in a Rehabilitation Setting

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Ekene Amaefule, MSN RN CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the importance of medication awareness.
  2. List the rules of medication compliance.
  3. Demonstrate ways in which to increase patient independence.

SAMS (self-administered medications system) is a program that is designed to enhance patient knowledge of their medications. As a result, it increases patient’s independence and their long-term medication adherence, which promotes positive health outcomes. In addition, SAMS empowers patient’s self-confidence and a skill set to be able to provide self-care, which helps alleviate some of the stress or burdens placed on family members and/or caregivers. Upon successful completion of the SAMS program, patients are able to be proficient with their medications at time of their discharge.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Session (400)
The Essential Role of the Rehabilitation Nurse in Facilitating Care Transitions:
What Role Do You Have?

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Michelle Camicia, MSN RN CRRN; Susan Wirt, MSN RN CRRN CCM CLCP CRP CNLCP; James Farrell, MBA RN CRRN; Terrie M. Black, MBA BSN RN-BC CRRN FAHA; Barbara Lutz, PhD RN CRRN APHN-BC FAHA FNAP FAAN; Karion Waites, RN CRRN DNP CSFNP

Learning objectives:

  1. Highlight the impetus for developing the White Paper (content to review the ACA and healthcare environment).
  2. Summarize the National Quality Strategy (content to discuss the 3 aims and 6 objectives).
  3. Discuss how the concept of care transitions supports the National Quality Strategy (content to discuss how this ties into transparency, quality, active patient/family engagement and ARN mission/goals/strategic plan).
  4. Describe the role of the rehabilitation nurse in care transitions.
  5. Apply the concepts of care transitions in daily practice (content to include high level best practices, key points, helpful hints and success stories for implementing).

The Association of Rehabilitation Nurses is committed to promoting the health and welfare of clients with disabilities and ensuring that the patient receives the right care at the right time by the right providers in the right setting. Appropriate care transitions promote the greatest value and the most effective and efficient care for clients with disabilities. It is integral that persons involved with healthcare policy decision making, educators, payers, and other stakeholders, including patients and their families, in health care understand the value of the rehabilitation nurse’s essential role in facilitating care transitions.

Target Audience: Beginner; Intermediate; Advanced

Concurrent Session (401)
FIM Documentation: Part 2—Optimizing the Value of the Rehabilitation Nurse

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Michelle Camicia, MSN RN CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the quality incentives placing increased responsibility upon nurses to measure and report effectiveness.
  2. Explore ways to engage nurses on the interprofessional team to optimize functional outcomes.
  3. Functional improvement is a quality measure under the pay for Value Based Purchasing in an environment where the value of the IRF level of care is under scrutiny. Strategies will be discussed to optimize functional gain in IRH.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (402)
Life Care Planning: Case Based Approach

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Terri S. Patterson, MSN RN CRRN FIALCP

Learning objectives:

  1. Delineate the role of the expert rehabiliation nurse in the preparation and ongoing care coordination of the Life Care Plan.
  2. Discuss the process of Life Care Planning from clinical assessment, rehabiliation care recommendations, service cost and alternatives of care due to diagnoses, disability management and aging.

The presentation will describe the process of life care planning, from the initial contact with the referral throughout the stages of the case, including legal aspects, fiduciary issues and ongoing care coordination. The discussion will utilize actual cases, both pediatric and adult, with numerous diagnoses addressing clinical care, rehabilitation services and outcomes, future implications of disability, family involvement, cost allocations, resources and alternative plans for life care. The expertise of the rehabilitation nurse in the life care planning process is crucial, and will be delineated through each stage of a life care plan, and ongoing care coordination.

Target Audience: Beginner

Concurrent Session (403)
Treatment of Acute and Chronic Wounds in the Rehab Patient

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Linda Droste, MSN RN CBIS CWOCN RN

Learning objectives:

  1. Name two advanced wound therapies used for the treatment of chronic wounds.
  2. Discuss treatment of the two most difficult pressure ulcers to heal.
  3. Discuss the most common types of wounds seen in the war injured polytrauma patient.

Nursing care of spinal cord injury, rehab and war injured patients with acute and chronic wounds that range from simple to complex.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (404)
Where is Nursing? The ARN Interdisciplinary Team Mock Rounds Experience

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Michele C. Cournan, DNP RN ANPBC CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the essential components of interdisciplinary team rounds.
  2. Describe communication skills necessary to participate in interdisciplinary team rounds.

"Valued," "credible," "leader," these are terms that should be used to describe the rehabilitation nurse during a team conference. Yet many rehabilitation nurses report feeling that their input is seen as inaccurate and not reliable. They feel as if their voices are not heard or if they are heard, minimized or ignored. Many lack the confidence or assertiveness to fully participate in the team process. This interactive session will demonstrate poor, better and best interdisciplinary team round scenarios. Audience members will assist team round "actors" to improve their participation towards the ideal state...all disciplines are vital to the successful outcomes of our patients and their families; BUT, only rehabilitation nurses are able to provide a 24/7/365 description of the patients' functional abilities.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Current Session (501)
ARN Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing
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Stephanie A. Vaughn, PhD RN CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the ARN Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing.
  2. Discuss the four domains and associated competencies.
  3. Discuss the potential utilization of the model in practice and academic settings.

To highlight the development of the ARN Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing, including the four domains and fourteen competencies; and how they will inform and enhance our nursing practice.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (502)
Caregiver Panel—Family-Centered Care: Voices of Family Caregivers
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Barbara J. Lutz, PhD RN CRRN

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify unmet needs of family caregivers of patients recovering from disabling illnesses.
  2. Discuss strategies to help assess the needs of family caregivers.
  3. Describe interventions to help address the needs of family caregivers.

This will be a panel presentation with family caregivers.

Target Audience: Beginner; Intermediate; Advanced

Concurrent Session (503)
Surviving a RAC Audit
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Pamela Roberts, PhD MSHA OT

Learning objectives:

  1. Increase awareness of the RAC audit process.
  2. Discuss elements and strategies for addressing RAC audits.
  3. Increase awareness of the appeal process.

This session will focus on the RAC initiative and its impact on rehabilitation. Discussion on how to develop a team including tactics to guide and improve performance will be highlighted. Common reasons for denial, steps in the appeal process and developing strategies for addressing the RAC audits including documentation requirements will be highlighted.

Target Audience: Intermediate

Concurrent Session (504)
Making Difficult Respiratory Topics Less Intimidating
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Lee Amari, RCP RRT

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand and incorporate the needs of the Adult Learner in teaching clinical and nonclinical learners.
  2. Incorporate the use of humor to decrease the learner's anxiety level.
  3. Spark the attendees' imagination and cultivate their creativity when creating teaching materials.

The presenter will examine through real life examples, how the use of humor in teaching intimidating and often scary respiratory topics can release the learner (clinical and lay persons) from the fear and anxiety that can hinder learning a new skill. A review of the needs of the Adult Learner and how to incorporate this in to the creation of teaching materials will be discussed.

Target Audience: Beginner; Intermediate